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Standing for Election

  1. Is it going to cost me lots of money to take part in these elections?
  2. I'm an international student, can I take part?
  3. Aren’t elections still just a popularity contest at the end of the day?
  4. Do I stand a chance of winning the election if there’s an incumbent standing?
  5. I’m not sure what to put in my manifesto…
  6. Who do I choose for my campaign team?
  7. Can I run in the election as my placement year?
  8. Do I have to know the job inside out?
  9. I’ve seen someone covering up my posters, what can I do?
  10. Do I have to miss my lectures during election week?
  11. What do you mean by ‘allowing students to cast their vote in private’?
  12. What do I do if someone is having trouble accessing the voting system?
  13. What are the key dates, when do I need to be available?

 

Is it going to cost me lots of money to take part in these elections?

Elections aren’t won by spending lots of money and the rules won’t let you do so either. Each candidate is given an elections resource pack with posters, t-shirts, banners and much more to help you put out printed materials. Candidates are then allowed to spend a further £75 of their own money but that is completely up to you – candidates have in the past run successful campaigns without spending a single penny of their own cash.

I'm an international student, can I take part?

Yes - Our current President is an international student, just make sure to speak to the International Office about your Visa.

Aren’t elections still just a popularity contest at the end of the day?

That depends what you mean by popularity. Obviously the most popular candidate wins, but that popularity could come from your policies or from an interesting and engaging campaign – you don’t have to be an extrovert that knows 1000 students by name.

Do I stand a chance of winning the election if there’s an incumbent standing?

Every candidate stands a chance; just because the incumbent won one election doesn’t mean they will win another, especially if students don’t think they have done a good job. You have to show why you would make a better choice and then sell that to the electorate. There are clear examples in recent elections where incumbents have failed to get re-elected.

I’m not sure what to put in my manifesto…

An easy way to start building up a manifesto is by going out and talking to students and seeing what issues they are currently facing. Moreover, you can use look at the Students’ Union strategic plan to see what projects students have already been suggested.

Who do I choose for my campaign team?

It’s always good to have a core group of people to help you with your campaign and help spread the word – you should try and get a good range of people from different courses and years. We would advise you to ensure that you don’t recruit more team members than you can realistically coordinate – remember you will be responsible for them. A big campaign team is not necessarily an effective one – more important is to choose people you can trust to represent you with the right skills to win you votes.

Can I run in the election as my placement year?

Yes. It's a brilliant opportunity to gain skills and run lots of exciting projects.

Do I have to know the job inside out?

Don’t worry - you don’t have to know what the job is straight away, as soon as you start the role you will be given plenty of training during the first few months, and throughout your time in office you will be supported by staff, who will help you to reach your targets.

Campaigning for Election

I’ve seen someone covering up my posters, what can I do?

Firstly, posters are not the be all and end all of elections and if your primary concern is posters then maybe you need to refocus your priorities. However, if you have any concerns you can contact the Student Voice, who will be able to advise you of the best way forward. You can also use the online complaints form if you would like to, however if you have time to complain then you have time to campaign - which is more important?

Do I have to miss my lectures during election week?

We advise that candidates don’t miss lectures during election week, remember your education is important and the reason you came to University. If you do decide to miss teaching time then we advise arranging with your tutors to catch up with the work that you miss, so that you don’t fall behind. If you are attending lectures make sure that your campaign keeps going and your campaign team are still out and about.

What do you mean by ‘allowing students to cast their vote in private’?

We understand that you would want to make the process of voting easy and simple. However, you have to make sure that each person has the chance to vote for whoever they want. If you are allowing someone to use your tablet or laptop then you need to make sure you don’t cast the vote for them. Giving them a chance to sit down is a great way of making sure they have enough space and privacy.

What do I do if someone is having trouble accessing the voting system?

First of all they you need to check that they are a member of the Students’ Union. You can check this via their student card – they should have the NUS Logo or Students’ Union logo on it. If they don’t, or they do but are still having problems, direct them to the Student Voice Team.

What are the key dates, when do I need to be available?

  • Nominations close: 23:59 21st January
     
  • Activities Debate 12:30 5th Feb
  • Community Debate 12:30 6th Feb
  • Education Debate 12:30 7th Feb
  • Equalities Debate 12:30 8th Feb
  • President Debate 6:30 8th Feb
     
  • Voting Open 10am 12th February
  • Voting Closed 4pm 14th February